Archive for January, 2010

Happy Xma…oh, sorry I’m a bit late, I was Holmes for the holiday!

January 5, 2010

Ah, at last, the holidays are over. Between the holidays and last semester, (busy, busy, busy) I have been neglecting my blog. I am back, however, and ready to post more frequently. I finished my coursework so now I prepare for comps and thesis writing, but this post concerns my other passion, Sherlockiana. I saw the new movie on Xmas day quite prepared for severe disappointment. I was. Disappointed, that is. I am something of a purist when it comes to Sherlock (and Shakespeare, for that matter), so I was duly alarmed to find him solving problems with his fists and not his brains. I am well aware of Sherlock’s amateur flirtations with “the sweet science,” and was willing to give Guy Ritchie the benefit of the doubt, yet Holmes is known for, Holmes IS, the personification of intellectual investigation. Sure, we saw bits and pieces of his method, including his summation, but the method should be the center piece of the story, not an afterthought.  I thought, though, that the dynamic between Holmes and Watson was interesting. Still a little confused over Irene Adler. Why exactly was she there? She did not play any significant role in moving the story along. I guess, in the end, Hollywood had to find some love interest for Holmes. All in all, it wasn’t a truly horrible film, just mildly so. The plot was vague and comic bookish. Much better, I think, to dive into a new series published by Titan Books called “The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.” Not a very original name for the series, I know, but if the volume I read is any indication, this series promises to be stimulating. So far, Titan has released seven or eight adventures, written by such Sherlockian luminaries as Daniel Stashower, H. Paul Jeffers, and David Stuart Davies. Some of the books have been previously published, but, as most are either out of print or printed by small houses, making them difficult to track down, this series should be a fine way to discover some old (and new) hidden gems.  Davies’  “The Veiled Detective” sets forth a much more convincing, and disturbing, alternative Holmes origin than the new film, and at 9 dollars it won’t cost as much. Back soon with a new mystery, ” The Case of the Seventh Century Trade Route!”